Wednesday, August 12, 2020

TIME WARP WIVES: MEET THE WOMEN WHO REALLY DO LIVE IN THE PAST

Find the article HERE.

Time Warp Wives: Meet the women who really do live in the past


The credit crunch, a knife crime epidemic - no wonder so many of us are sick of the 21st century. Most of us just grumble, but some women have taken radical action to escape what they see as the soulless grind of modern life. Meet the 'Time Warp Wives', who believe that life, especially marriage, was far more straightforward in the Thirties, Forties and Fifties.
1950s                                                                                
Joanne Massey, 35, lives in a recreation of a 1950s home in Stafford with her husband Kevin, 42, who works as a graphics application designer. Joanne is a housewife. She says:
I love nothing better than fastening my pinny round my waist and baking a cake for Kevin in my 1950s kitchen.
I put on some lovely Frank Sinatra music and am completely lost in my own little fantasy world. In our marriage, I am very much a lady and Kevin is the breadwinner and my protector.
Enlarge   time warp wives
Joanne Massey: 'Living like this makes me happier'
We've been married for 13 years and we're extremely happy because we both know our roles. There is none of the battling for equality that I see in so many marriages today.
What's wrong with wanting to be adored and spoiled? If I see a hat I like, I say 'Oh, we can't afford that' and Kevin says: 'You have it, I'll treat you.'
I don't even put petrol in our Ford Anglia car, which is 43 years old, because I think that is so unladylike. I ask Kevin to do it.
I make sure our home is immaculate, there is dinner on the table, and I look pretty to welcome my husband home.
My kitchen is an original 'English Rose' design, with units made from metal, which was very much the 'in thing' then.
We bought it from a family in Scotland who saw our advert in an antiques magazine.
They had it in their garage to keep tools in, so it needed renovation. I have an original Kenwood Mixer, the phone is bright pink Bakelite, and even my crockery is original 1950s.
Feel good: Debbie's lifestyle makes her feel 'as if I’m living in
one of those old-fashioned TV shows where everything is always wonderful'
We had the hall carpet made for us with an authentic swirling geometric pattern. I like to close the front door, pull off my gloves and know that I am in my own world.
I only ever wear 1950s clothing, such as tight pencil skirts, a white blouse and a wide belt.
Kevin wears 'modern' clothes for work, but at weekends he wears a smart suit and a trilby.
I admit I am in retreat from the 21st century. When I look at the reality of the world today, with all the violence, greed and materialism, I shudder. I don't want to live in that world.
Enlarge   Joanne Massey
Relaxed: Joanne thinks modern life is too hectic and likes to take her time
Neither of us drinks and our social life revolves around visiting like-minded friends for tea and cakes.
I try not to interact with the modern world too much at all. Shopping in supermarkets is an ordeal, and I only recently realised that Tony Blair is no longer Prime Minister as I don't read newspapers - they are just too distressing.
We do have a television set, but we hide it in a retro cabinet and only watch things like Miss Marple, Poirot and Foyle's War.
My obsession began as a teenager, when I loved old movies because they seemed to represent a halcyon time, when women were more feminine and men more protective.
Enlarge   time warp wives
Authentic: Joanne only ever wears 1950s clothing and her furniture is also from the era
I went to a grammar school and could have gone to university, but chose to work in a bank.
I was marking time until I met the right man. Kevin and I met in 1993 at a Fifties Convention, and we had an old-fashioned courtship before he proposed.
I was ecstatic, because I had found someone with the same passion for the period.
Today's society is all rush, rush, rush, whereas I like to take my time. I never leave the house without lipstick on, and I also like to help neighbours - collecting their pensions and doing shopping for them, just as women in the 1950s would do.
It may sound silly, but living like this really does make me happier - as though I'm existing in one of those old-fashioned TV shows where everything is always wonderful.
My despair at the modern world is one of the reasons why we haven't had children.
I would be terrified they would be offered drugs, or become the victims of violence.
Some women I meet ask me if I feel patronised by being a housewife and spending my time caring for Kevin, but I never would.
At work, he gets teased because he's the only one with home-made cakes and even home-made jam in his sandwiches.
But I often wonder if his colleagues aren't slightly jealous that he has a wife who devotes herself to his happiness. How many men these days can really say that?
1940s                                                                                 
Debbie Cleulow, 34, lives in Upper Tean in Staffordshire with her husband Martin, 38, who works for a JCB contractor. Debbie says:
When I see a girl walking down the street wearing next to nothing, I think: 'Why don't you have more respect for yourself?'
Other women may laugh at my determination to make my home perfect for my husband, Martin, but I enjoy spending my leisure time baking cakes and sewing.
Enlarge   time warp wives
Debbie Cleulow: 'I try to make my home perfect for my husband'
I really believe that women today have lost their way, with bingedrinking ladettes and children as young as 11 going out in tiny tops.
The age of innocence has been lost and it is such a shame. My idol is Ava Gardner and when I watch her films - as I do all the time - I think that so much has been lost from today's society.
I've made my home a shrine to the Forties, and I only ever wear clothes from that decade. Other people may laugh at me, but I really don't care.
I think I have a far happier marriage than many other people I meet, because we have strict demarcations in our roles.
I do all the cleaning, ironing, washing and cooking, and Martin puts up shelves and looks after the car. He's the breadwinner and I create a lovely - and loving - environment for him.
I met Martin when I was 17 - we lived in the same village - and he has been my only serious boyfriend.
It's so much more romantic only ever to have been in love with one man. My obsession with the 1940s really began through Martin, as he was already going to Forties events when we met.
I have spent so many happy hours sourcing retro furniture and kitchen gadgets for our home, and gradually we are eradicating every trace of the modern age.
Debbie Cleulow
Retro: Debbie and her husband attract plebty of attention when they leave the house
We have an old black Bakelite phone, I use a retro Swan kettle and a full 1940s dinner service which my parents bought for us from an antiques centre.
I inherited our oak bedroom suite from my grandparents. It's stamped with the 'CC41' utility mark, which shows it complies with the rationing of the time.
Likewise, some of my clothes are stamped with the same mark. I wear vintage dresses during the day, and for evenings and weekends I will dress up in the full glamour of satin evening dresses with high heels.
I wouldn't dream of leaving the house without gloves and a hat. When we go out, we do attract a lot of attention and some people laugh, but I think that is their problem.
We aren't friendly with anyone who doesn't share our love of the Forties. Some people might think I am hiding my head in the sand, harking back to an age that is long gone.
But to me, the 1940s was a time when people were much more friendly to each other - they really cared about their neighbours.
As it is, I hardly know the people who live next to us. Of course, I'm not such a Luddite that I don't use modern medicines and other comforts of modern life when I need to, but I find a genuine happiness in living in a time when life was simpler.
My job is to devote myself to Martin. He has a physical, stressful job and he loves coming home to a wife who looks pretty, has his meal ready in an immaculate house and has all the time in the world for him.
1930s                                                                                  
Diane Rowlands, 38, works parttime in a customer service centre. She lives with Martin, who is 40 and works in a warehouse. Diane says:
My love for the Thirties started with the music. As a teenager, I loved to listen to the big band sound and I would sit entranced for hours watching films starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. They were so glamorous.
Back then, the world just seemed a sunnier place, even though it was an austere time between the wars.
Enlarge   time warp wives
Diane Rowlands: 'Ideally, I’d spend all day in my pinny'
Women were these amazingly glamorous creatures, with their perfect hair and immaculate makeup, and they were treated with such respect by men.
Men and women knew their roles in society and there wasn't all this pressure on women to have to go out to work and try to be equal to men.
I do work part-time, but only because we need the money. However, we still have clearly defined roles in the home and I am the one who does most of the cooking and cleaning.
I adore baking cakes and if I had my way I would spend all of my days in my pinny, making my house look immaculate.
Martin and I spend hours sourcing clothes from the 1930s and I am always dressed in period costume.
I usually spend around £50 to £150 per item. I buy them from the internet and vintage clothing specialists, and I have wardrobes full of wonderful old clothes and items such as cloche hats and Mary-Jane shoes with T-bar straps.
At first I was a bit dubious about going out dressed in Thirties clothing, but I am totally used to it now.

Anyone for tea? Diane spends hours on the internet sourcing items for her 1930s lifestyle
Comments from strangers can be pretty bitchy, though, because people just don't like anything that's out of the ordinary.
The Thirties was a much more moral time and there was a real camaraderie between people.
I try to escape from where we are now and rarely read newspapers because I find today's world so depressing.
The pace of life today is so hectic and I think there is so much pressure on women to be like men. It is all wrong.
I love to wear dresses and skirts, look immaculate and be treated like a lady. My home is entirely decorated with 1930s furniture, wallpaper, carpets and ornaments.
Retreating to this world is our sanctuary.

TIME WARP WIVES; THE RETRO HOUSEWIFE

I would like to start out my new blog with this interview of the retro housewife that started it all for me:

http://timewarpwivesguestinterviews.blogspot.com/2010/10/jenny-retro-housewife.html


Saturday, December 13, 2008


Jenny The Retro Housewife

State of Illinois

“I’m sure there are several different opinions of what a retro housewife is, but for me its many things. It's deeper than just liking vintage clothing or objects. It's rejoicing in taking care of your family, it's pride in your home, [in] being a good hostess. It's wanting what is best for your family and knowing that you are the one that can best provide those things that are best.”

Jenny, who authors the Retro Housewife Blog, loves the simplicity of days gone by and strives for that in her life. Although she considers herself a modern retro housewife and is passionate about her roles as housewife and mom, Jenny finds it important to take time to nurture herself and find her own individuality through things that she loves.

This Army wife and mother is originally from New York. She lives for God and her family, is passionate about housekeeping and child rearing, and believes in old fashion values and morals. Jenny tries to teach her daughter about differences in people and about kindness despite those differences. She also has taught her that words can hurt and that compassion is a quality she already has in abundance. “God is huge in our life, and he guides us every step of the way. We strive for togetherness. It seems like so many families are just doing their own thing these days. They are more like roommates than family”.

Jenny's talents are not limited to being a thrifty and financially frugal housewife. She is also quite creative. She sculpts, draws, paints and is an interior designer. She also loves photography and is a pretty good at it. Jenny related, “when my daughter was a baby I would take a lot of photos of her and have them developed at Walmart. I soon learned to bring my camera with me because they thought they were professional and wouldn’t let me print them."
Jenny comes from a long line of artists. She is a descendant of Lillian Miller, a famous painter who specialized in Japanese art. Her grandfather was a sketch artist and carver. Her father paints, sculpts, draws, and has the ability to quickly teach himself to play most instruments. It’s no wonder that this housewife's creativity comes naturally.

Jenny admits that she is a neat freak and that it helps in being a retro housewife because cleaning doesn’t feel like a chore. “I love everything in its place. On the other hand, that can be a negative too, because anytime things are out of place, I feel like my house is a wreck!”
She also loves to cook. Her daughter has been helping her since she was a year old. “Some days we just get up and want to make cookies so that’s what we will do. These are the memories that will stick with her.”

This passionate housewife and mother has had to face one of her biggest challenges, to which many housewives and mothers can relate - monotony. Jenny explained, “We love being together, but you really do have to do your own thing once in awhile, especially as a mom. Being a mom and a wife is important, but you have to remember that there is an individual inside and if you don’t nurture that person you will disappear and become quite dull”.

When Jenny’s husband got out of the Army and they moved to Illinois, she went through a few months of feeling worthless and boring. Jenny was used to doing it all and felt guilty if she asked her husband to do anything. “I had gone from being a leader of my husband’s company Family Readiness Group, meeting with higher ups in his battalion, dealing with the family members, solving problems, etc., to being stuck in the house all day everyday with no friends and a two year old who, at that time, they said was autistic. I just felt like I had no clue who I was, I was lost. I never had a break from my daughter, I was never, ever alone.”

Jenny then started to take steps to take care of herself. Jenny bought herself a membership at a gym that had a daycare. She would spend an hour or two each day doing Yoga or Pilates while her daughter happily played with other children her age. At home once or twice a week, Jenny would leave her daughter downstairs with her husband, put the baby gate at the bottom of the stairs, take a bath, give herself a facial, and read while she soaked. “I did something that was for me and that saved me. When I saw the positive effects taking care of myself gave my family, I started to do more for myself. You need to take time for yourself each and every day, even if its only 20 minutes.”
Jenny also found herself through her blog. “At first I didn’t tell anyone that I was starting it, that way no one I knew could read it and know it was me. I wrote from my heart and with honesty, no fear of hurting anyone’s feelings. As comments came in and I got to see that other people appreciated my thoughts and there are people out there like me. That was priceless.”

To women who have lost their individuality Jenny advised, “Fight for it! I know how confusing it is. I mean how in the world do you figure out who you are? Take a notebook and get away by yourself, write down your perfect life, your perfect work, no limitations. For instance, mine was getting a massage once a month, having a tiffany blue kitchen, taking a class, having hot stew on a cold winters day, learning a new craft.” Jenny ended up with a list about a mile long. And what she learned was that even though some of those things in her list, were not possible to do because of her circumstances, many of the small things were and that they added up to a big part of her life. “So what I couldn’t achieve, I kept as a dream, a goal. What I could achieve, I started to work on," she said.

Her Retro Housewife Blog was Jenny’s first experience blogging. She started this particular blog back in May of 2008. At that time she was learning to clean and live without chemicals, because of her daughter’s sensitivity. Her intention was for her blog to be about going green. Then as Jenny started to write she found that she had other things to say and people were actually reading , which still amazes her. So The Retro Housewife Blog as we see it now was born. “My blog is actually a hodge podge of things. One day you may come on and find a recipe or a book review, the next day it may just be my opinion on a subject. Sometimes I run series, for example I recently ran one that featured daily videos on how to apply pin up make up. I like to post things right out of my vintage housewife manuals so my readers can see right into the past, see what housewives were told, what was expected.”

In one of her posts for her Retro Housewife blog, Jenny describes what her perfect town would be. “A perfect place for me would be a place of simplicity where women stayed home with their children. Their children could roam the neighborhoods playing without the fear of abduction. New neighbors would be welcomed with a plate of cookies. Dinner parties would be the norm and people would take pride in the appearance of their homes as well as themselves.” As a side note, after Jenny had described her perfect town, she realized that she had created a Stepford town.

Jenny’s passion for vintage has always been there. Back in the fifties, Jenny’s father who was then a teenager belonged to a band. So she grew up with him teaching her the great songs from the fifties. In addition she also grew up watching shows like: I Dream of JeannieI Love LucyThe HoneymoonersThe Andy Griffith Show. She also enjoys old films like, Roman Holiday and Hitchcock films. Her favorite artists are Marilyn Monroe, Grace Kelly, and Audrey Hepburn. Jenny gets inspired by her collection of vintage cookbooks, vintage aprons, table cloths, and older TV shows and movies.

Although Jenny doesn’t consider herself a Timewarpian, she admits that part of her is. “I enjoy the comforts of modern age too much to give them up. I guess you could say I’m a Timewarpian Hybrid."
Jenny enjoys the clothing, the cooking, the books and cookbooks, the shows, the etiquette, the values and morals. And she strives to incorporate that into her life both in how she looks and in her home. Jenny then added, “I think balance between the two worlds is a good thing.”

We asked Jenny what year she would visit if she could travel back in time.

“I don’t think I could pick a specific year to go back to. I could narrow it down to the WWII and post WWII era. I know it was a hard time with the war. My own husband has been to war twice now for a year each time, so I have a taste of what it would be like. Its such a huge part of American history and how amazing would it have been to live through that. It seems like Americans really banded together, working together toward a common cause. Post WWII is because it was a time of hope and joy. The part I don’t think I could handle would be the inequality between the races, it breaks my heart to know how minorities were treated back then.”

She shared with us her goals: "I was recently diagnosed with Celiac Disease. So I'm currently working on a gluten free cookbook. And I'm hoping [to get] published in a couple of years."
Her short term goals are: Work out 3-5 days a week. Eat well. Take care of her appearance. Then she added, “bite my tongue when I don’t have anything positive to say.”



Copyright © 2008-2010 Time Warp Wives



Jenny

Contact Information:



Update: Jenny changed her blog address to fit her theme. Below is her new address.
The Retro Housewife Blog:
http://ahappyhomeisaretrohome.blogspot.com/

1 comment:

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BEAUTY THEN AND NOW BY THE ORIGINAL RETRO HOUSEWIFE

By JennyConlon -- the original retro housewife who started it all for me.



SOPHIA LOREN; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

JAYNE MANSFIELD; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

SIZE MODEL; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

KEIRA KNIGHTLY; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

May I just ask...what happened? Look at how happy and vibrant the actresses in the first two pictures look, now look at the last two, they look like they may just drop at any second. When did our society become so sick and twisted that looking like a cancer patient is sexy? I am 5'5" and a respectful and healthy 135 pounds but even I feel the pressure to be thinner, have smaller thighs and fit into a smaller size. Ladies we have to change our way of thinking and our societies way of thinking. We can do it, WE are our daughters role models which means we ARE shaping how the future thinks. When you feel the urge to criticize your body STOP, you never know what little ears are around. That's why I have body issues now. My mother is a fantastic person but she is also her worst enemy. I grew up hearing her degrade herself and her body, if she ate to much she would say she was fat and disgusting or a pig with complete disdain in her voice. I doubt she realized at the time that her words would haunt me and put me in line to think the same things about myself.

I have to say my goal this year was to drop 5 to 10 pounds but I'm going to break the cycle right this minute. If I were at an unhealthy weight I wouldn't be saying that but I am at a healthy weight, I have to stop my way of thinking in its tracks. Now I'm going to work out to stay healthy, to maintain my weight, because I like how I feel when my body is strong. I'm not going to let my daughter grow up with an unhealthy expectation for herself. She will learn to be active and she will learn to eat healthfully and all things in moderation.

In the meantime would someone get those girls a cheeseburger???

By JennyConlon, author of the original "The Retro Housewife" blog.

BEAUTY THEN AND NOW BY THE ORIGINAL RETRO HOUSEWIFE

By JennyConlon -- the original retro housewife who started it all for me.



SOPHIA LOREN; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

JAYNE MANSFIELD; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

SIZE MODEL; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

KEIRA KNIGHTLY; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

May I just ask...what happened? Look at how happy and vibrant the actresses in the first two pictures look, now look at the last two, they look like they may just drop at any second. When did our society become so sick and twisted that looking like a cancer patient is sexy? I am 5'5" and a respectful and healthy 135 pounds but even I feel the pressure to be thinner, have smaller thighs and fit into a smaller size. Ladies we have to change our way of thinking and our societies way of thinking. We can do it, WE are our daughters role models which means we ARE shaping how the future thinks. When you feel the urge to criticize your body STOP, you never know what little ears are around. That's why I have body issues now. My mother is a fantastic person but she is also her worst enemy. I grew up hearing her degrade herself and her body, if she ate to much she would say she was fat and disgusting or a pig with complete disdain in her voice. I doubt she realized at the time that her words would haunt me and put me in line to think the same things about myself.

I have to say my goal this year was to drop 5 to 10 pounds but I'm going to break the cycle right this minute. If I were at an unhealthy weight I wouldn't be saying that but I am at a healthy weight, I have to stop my way of thinking in its tracks. Now I'm going to work out to stay healthy, to maintain my weight, because I like how I feel when my body is strong. I'm not going to let my daughter grow up with an unhealthy expectation for herself. She will learn to be active and she will learn to eat healthfully and all things in moderation.

In the meantime would someone get those girls a cheeseburger???

ByJennyConlon, author of the original "The Retro Housewife" blog.


By JennyConlon -- the original retro housewife who started it all for me.



SOPHIA LOREN; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

JAYNE MANSFIELD; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

SIZE MODEL; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

KEIRA KNIGHTLY; PICTURE CREDIT UNKNOWN

May I just ask...what happened? Look at how happy and vibrant the actresses in the first two pictures look, now look at the last two, they look like they may just drop at any second. When did our society become so sick and twisted that looking like a cancer patient is sexy? I am 5'5" and a respectful and healthy 135 pounds but even I feel the pressure to be thinner, have smaller thighs and fit into a smaller size. Ladies we have to change our way of thinking and our societies way of thinking. We can do it, WE are our daughters role models which means we ARE shaping how the future thinks. When you feel the urge to criticize your body STOP, you never know what little ears are around. That's why I have body issues now. My mother is a fantastic person but she is also her worst enemy. I grew up hearing her degrade herself and her body, if she ate to much she would say she was fat and disgusting or a pig with complete disdain in her voice. I doubt she realized at the time that her words would haunt me and put me in line to think the same things about myself.

I have to say my goal this year was to drop 5 to 10 pounds but I'm going to break the cycle right this minute. If I were at an unhealthy weight I wouldn't be saying that but I am at a healthy weight, I have to stop my way of thinking in its tracks. Now I'm going to work out to stay healthy, to maintain my weight, because I like how I feel when my body is strong. I'm not going to let my daughter grow up with an unhealthy expectation for herself. She will learn to be active and she will learn to eat healthfully and all things in moderation.

In the meantime would someone get those girls a cheeseburger???

ByJennyConlon, author of the original "The Retro Housewife" blog.

POEM: EMPTY CHURCHES BY W. E. Isenhour


"Empty Churches"
Empty churches and well-filled jails,
Empty churches and mankind fails;
Empty churches and liquor flows,
Empty churches and evil grows;
Empty churches and sin's in style,
Empty churches and youth goes wild;
Empty churches and wasted lives,
Empty churches and Satan thrives.
Empty churches and prayerless hearts,
Empty churches and Christ departs;
Empty churches and homes are sad,
Empty churches and men go mad;
Empty churches, no Pentecost.
Empty churches and souls are lost;
Empty churches and drunkards die,
Empty churches and orphans cry.
Empty churches and revivals cease,
Empty churches and crimes increase;
Empty churches and gamblers meet,
Empty churches and wrongs defeat;
Empty churches and war clouds roll;
Empty churches and no control;
Empty churches, forsaken pews,
Empty churches and bad, bad news.
Empty churches and nations blight,
Empty churches, O sad, sad sight!
Empty churches, men hate and kill,
Empty churches, and much ill will;
Empty churches, O sad the truth,
Empty churches, defeated youth.
Empty churches, it's bad to tell,
Empty churches, men go to hell.
Poem by: W. E. Isenhour


"Empty Churches"
Empty churches and well-filled jails,
Empty churches and mankind fails;
Empty churches and liquor flows,
Empty churches and evil grows;
Empty churches and sin's in style,
Empty churches and youth goes wild;
Empty churches and wasted lives,
Empty churches and Satan thrives.
Empty churches and prayerless hearts,
Empty churches and Christ departs;
Empty churches and homes are sad,
Empty churches and men go mad;
Empty churches, no Pentecost.
Empty churches and souls are lost;
Empty churches and drunkards die,
Empty churches and orphans cry.
Empty churches and revivals cease,
Empty churches and crimes increase;
Empty churches and gamblers meet,
Empty churches and wrongs defeat;
Empty churches and war clouds roll;
Empty churches and no control;
Empty churches, forsaken pews,
Empty churches and bad, bad news.
Empty churches and nations blight,
Empty churches, O sad, sad sight!
Empty churches, men hate and kill,
Empty churches, and much ill will;
Empty churches, O sad the truth,
Empty churches, defeated youth.
Empty churches, it's bad to tell,
Empty churches, men go to hell.
Poem by: W. E. Isenhour


FATHER GEORGE W. RUTLER


IMAGE FROM INTERNET

FROM THE PASTOR
October 30, 2016

by Fr. George W. Rutler
Exactly eight years ago I wrote a column titled “The One We Were Waiting For” in which I referred to a book by Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson, The Lord of the World. That dystopian novel has been cited by Pope Benedict XVI, and Pope Francis said he has read it several times. The protagonist, if one can apply that term to an Anti-Christ, imposed a new world religion with Man himself as god.  His one foe was Christianity, which he thwarted in part by using “compromised Catholics and compliant priests to persuade timid Catholics.”

 
  Since then, that program has been realized in our time, to an extent beyond the warnings of the most dire pessimists. Our federal government has intimidated religious orders and churches, challenging religious freedom. The institution of the family has been re-defined, and sexual identity has been Gnosticized to the point of mocking biology. Assisted suicide is spreading, abortions since 1973 have reached a total equal to the population of Italy, and sexually transmitted diseases are at a record high. Objective journalism has died, justice has been corrupted, racial bitterness ruins cities, entertainment is degraded, knowledge of the liberal arts spirals downwards, and authentically Catholic universities have all but vanished. A weak and confused foreign policy has encouraged aggressor nations and terrorism, while metastasized immigration is destroying remnant western cultures, and genocide is slaughtering Christian populations. The cynical promise of economic prosperity is mocked by the lowest rate of labor participation in forty years, an unprecedented number of people on food stamps and welfare assistance, and the largest disparity in wealth in over a century.
 In his own grim days, Saint Augustine warned against nostalgia: “The past times that you think were good, are good because they are not yours here and now.” The present time, however, might try even his confidence. Sands blow over the ruins of churches he knew in North Africa where the Cross is virtually forbidden. By a blessed irony, a new church is opened every day in formerly Communist Russia, while churches in our own formerly Christian nation are being closed daily. For those who bought into the seductions of politicians’ false hopes, there is the counsel of Walt Kelly’s character Pogo: “It’s always darkest before it goes pitch black.”

It is incorrect to say that the coming election poses a choice between two evils. For ethical and aesthetic reasons, there may be some bad in certain candidates, but badness consists in doing bad things. Evil is different: it is the deliberate destruction of truth, virtue and holiness. 
While one may pragmatically vote for a flawed candidate, one may not vote for anyone who advocates and enables unmitigatedly evil acts, and that includes abortion. “In the case of an intrinsically unjust law, such as a law permitting abortion or euthanasia, it is therefore never licit to obey it, or to 'take part in a propaganda campaign in favor of such a law, or vote for it'" (Evangelium Vitae, 73).
At one party’s convention, the name of God was excluded from its platform and a woman who boasted of having aborted her child was applauded. It is a grave sin, requiring sacramental confession and penance, to become an accomplice in objective evil by voting for anyone who encourages it, for that imperils the nation and destroys the soul.
It is also the duty of the clergy to make this clear and not to shrink, under the pretense of charity, from explaining the Church's censures. Wolves in sheep’s clothing are dangerous, but worse are wolves in shepherd’s clothing. While the evils foreseen eight years ago were realized, worse would come if those affronts to human dignity were endorsed again.

In the most adverse prospect, God forbid, there might not be another free election, and soon Catholics would arrive at shuttered churches and vacant altars. The illusion of indifference cannot long be perpetuated by lame jokes and synthetic laughter at banquets, for there is handwriting on the wall. 
       

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

THIS 1955 "GOOD HOUSEWIFE'S GUIDE" EXPLAINS HOW WOMEN SHOULD TREAT THEIR HUSBANDS


Image from the article. Read the article HERE.

https://dustyoldthing.com/1955-guide-housewife-rules/?utm_source=glp-dot&utm_medium=social-fb&fbclid=IwAR2MKr8f_q3EFwF-9e6SVfoHxK4X-Ny47QxY84rQg91uBYZcAK9gZ-FHBT4

A SPICE RACK AND I GET TO TIME TRAVEL


I GOT TO TIME-TRAVEL TODAY
My birthday is coming up in 2 days, and I asked Glenn for a cool vintage wooden spice rack (similar to the one in the picture) like the one I had when I was a bride! I found one on E-bay that was from 1960. It came today, in its original box, no less, and the crumpled newspaper that cushioned it was also from 1960!

(The Martinsburg Journal, Wednesday, January 13, 1960. I assume Martinsburg is in Maryland, since that is where the package came from, although there is a Martinsburg, W.Va., and other news items on the scraps of paper are from Charleston, W.Va.)

The pieces of newspaper were mostly classified ads (a house for $9,500!), but there was one article that said, "Presbyterians Show Divided Political View." The article reads:

"WASHINGTON (UPI) -- The clergymen of one major Protestant denomination are sharply divided in their attitudes toward a Catholic presidential candidate, a poll disclosed today.
The denomination is the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. which has about 3,100,000 members mostly in northern and western areas.
The view of its clergy were solicited by a magazine named "Monday Morning" which is published by the denomination and distributed free to all of its members.
Of the 10,947 ministers on the mailing lists, 1,047, or about 10 percent, filled out and returned a questionnaire which appeared in the Nov. 16 edition. Since the questionnaire had to be clipped out, pasted to a postcard and mailed, a voluntary response of 10 percent indicated a fairly strong interest.
THREE STATEMENTS
The questionnaire consisted of three statements supposed to cover the range of possible Protestant attitudes toward a Catholic presidential candidate. Clergymen agreed, disagreed or were undecided about each statement.
The most "liberal" position was reflected by the statement: "The religious affiliation of a presidential candidate is irrelevant."
Only 57 of the clergymen agreed and the rest didn't respond to the statement.
HIGH RESPONSE
The opposite extreme of view was represented by the statement: A Protestant minister might support a Roman Catholic candidate if the candidate gave assurance he would uphold the principle and practice of separation of church and state.
Agreement was expressed by 469 ministers, and disagreement by 445. Seventy-seven said they were undecided.
The only avowed Catholic presidential aspirant, Sen. John F. Kennedy (D-Mass.) is on record with assurances that he would uphold church-state separation. Neither Kennedy nor any other possible candidate was mentioned by name in the poll."

I remember my husband quoting his father as saying, "If Kennedy gets elected, we'll have the Pope in the White House!"